Sunny Sunday

Sunny with a caveat.

We had two-and-a-half inches of rain last night–more rain than we needed, and now my yard is once again a swamp.

To make matters worse, Word Press is doing funny things today, so I’m not sure how this post will turn out. But.

Here’s a fern baby from my Japanese painted fern. It was a single frond when I moved it from the north side, and seems to be doing well. The full-sized ferns I transplanted died the day after being moved–upsetting because they were a few years old and very beautiful. I’ll be happy if this one survives, which it seems to be doing.

Well, I have a lot more to say, but Word Press just isn’t working for me. I keep getting a “Recover Web Site” message and I’m not sure why. Does anyone out there in Word Press land know?

Egress

For all the years I worked from home in a basement office, I had fire on the brain. With my horror-story sensibilities, I’d ask myself how I’d get out of the two foot by three foot window that–frankly–no one had ever opened.

Thus began the “egress discussion” that Jim and I would indulge in every six months or so. How to get out of the basement? This year, we finally decided that we’d look into getting an egress window dug. The impetus? HGTV. Of course.

We found Foundation 1, a local company and last week, they came out to hand dig around the foundation and put in a window. Here it is, Day 1.

We kept hoping it wouldn’t rain and, except for a light sprinkle on Day 2, we got lucky.

The prep for this was to utterly destroy my north bed where I had ferns and hostas. I was able to transplant most of the ferns–newer plants. My Master Gardener friend, Linda, graciously gave a home to the baby hostas springing up all over. Sadly, I lost the five-year-old Japanese Painted Fern, which had multiplied times three. I did save one of its babies, so there’s hope.

We did find a few frogs in the basement at the start of Day 2. Hmm.

Here is the window at the start of Day 2. A hole in the wall and a big pile of clay. That clay is a bit of a caveat on a five-star review. I can’t plant in it and the pile is high around the window, supposedly keeping out water. Since it rained an inch the day after the window went in, and our basement stayed dry, maybe there’s something to that. We’ll see if it settles as promised.

And the finished project at the end of Day 2. Of course, we still have to fix the interior wall, but we now have an escape hatch, complete with ladder.

A temporary but significant mess. And noisy.

We always say that this project is the last project. Maybe…

Yet Another Stormy Sunday

Another unnecessary inch of rain overnight. The grass is spring green and growing faster than we can mow. But the trees know it’s almost autumn, dropping leaves like crazy.

Out of the house most of the day to hear Madeline sing the blues at One Block South. Boy howdy, that girl can wail.

Tomorrow is Monday and back to the grind of cleaning up veg and flower beds, along with final preparations for #PitchWars on Tuesday. Or maybe it’s Wednesday. I should check.

A happy new week to you all.

Encouraging Rejections

No one likes rejection, right? But the other night, I got one of the nicest rejections ever. I’ve had a few of those along the way, and they always cheer me immeasurably.

The rejection in question was in response to a query for my novel, The Last Summer Queen. After apologizing for taking six months to get back to me, the agent wrote that they didn’t take novels like mine, but that after reading what I’d sent, she’d been tempted. And to please keep them in mind if I write another novel.

Now I had to question what reasoning allowed me to send a novel that didn’t fit, although that’s a longer discussion for another day. But yes, indeed, I have a novel in the pipeline that, judging by what she said, might work for her. If only I had time enough to write it now.

An encouraging rejection is not an acceptance, after all. But it is encouraging. And I was … encouraged.

Totally fits with my Embracing Rejection approach to submissions.

I’m Busy

No joke. It’s a busy time of year and I find myself getting more and more distracted.

The photo shows yesterday’s garden haul. Cucumbers and eggplant, peppers and cherry tomatoes. I gave away most everything. While I’m planning on making babaganoush one of these days, it won’t be today. The cukes and tomatoes I still have will go into dinner salads. I just have to run out and buy lettuce. Maybe tomorrow.

Meanwhile, the PitchWars submission starts a week from today. The Romance Writers of America contest submission will go in later that same week. I’m still waiting to hear from six agents and an e-publisher. I’m staying positive and Learning2bLucky about it all.

Meanwhile, I’ve been thinking–incessantly–about an old story I tried to write many years ago. Clones steal a human egg that’s earmarked to produce a genetically different leader for their world. And get caught. Can’t get it out of my mind. Keep writing notes. And frankly, I’m too busy for short-story writing at the moment.

I also have it mind to start some microgreens in the basement. That seems doable in October. Since I have zero experience, I’m eagerly asking for advice from the knowledgeable.

Here’s hoping for cooler temps as summer comes to an end this weekend. Happy Fall.

Windy Sunday

Got out early this morning. The temps are predicted to be in the upper 80’s with heat index closer to upper 90’s, so any outside work had to get done before the heat set in. Here are the morning glories with the sun rising in the background.

Lots of veggies to harvest and lots of weeds too, but it’s coming down to planting cool weather crops and getting the flower beds ready for winter.

Happy Sunday, all.

Finally, Watermelon

Short blog today. I’m running, with lots to do this month both writing and in the garden. It’s the start of fall, despite the sizzling September temperatures.

But here’s our success story for the week. We actually grew an edible watermelon.

Some years were too hot, too dry, or too wet at the wrong time. Most years, we picked it too soon or too late. Some years coyote or deer got to it first, destroying the fruit.

But this year, the heavens shone on us and we got one–maybe two–amazing, enormous, sweet and delicious melons.

Yay.