Partly Cloudy Sunday

Early Sunday morning. Found this leaf in the yard and asked, “Is it fall?”

Well no, technically not. Fall is arriving in approximately thirty-four days. It’s still summer, still August, and supposed to be still hot. But it’s not. We’ve had storms every night of the past three, and mornings have been cloudy and cool.

Once the sun burns through the clouds, though, it’s summer again, hot and steamy. So while fall garden clean-up has started, I work only early and retreat to air-conditioned comfort in the afternoon.

Those readers who follow my Monday gardening posts will be saddened to know that I do indeed have both bag worms and cottonwood borers. I’ll be posting the “fix” on Monday, weather permitting. And if the weather is bad, the blog will be delayed.

Meanwhile, I’m enjoying this foretaste of my favorite season and sitting on my hands to avoid pulling out the Halloween decorations. Hope it doesn’t turn unseasonably warm in September.


Rainy Sunday

The morning started with rain and thunder, and so far, we’ve had a quarter inch of rain. Lucky, Jim mowed yesterday, so the yard at least looks good.

If it would rain an inch every weekend from now until–say–October 1, I wouldn’t have to haul hose and buckets. That’d be good.

The chrysanthemums and Autumn Joy sedum are in bloom. It looks like I’ve successfully eliminated the balsam that reseeded every year. Now, all I have to worry about are the trees, one of which looks like it has borers. More on that tomorrow.

Just hanging out, waiting for Fall.

Sunny Sunday

Sunny and hot, though not as hot as August ought to be. Here’s Loki–our Vizsla–soaking up some rays.

We’ve had a bit of rain this week, maybe about three-quarters of an inch. Although our neighbor down the street said he had eight inches. I suppose, given the way rain falls in Kansas, that’s possible. More rain predicted for later in the week, which will give my newly planted pecan trees a much-needed drink.

For those who don’t already know, check out my short story “Fluttering” in Dark Moon Digest 36. There’s a Kindle version in addition to print. Of course, if bugs terrify you, don’t read it.

I’m busy and feeling like there’s tons left on my plate before summer ends–and signs of fall are everywhere. So I need to hop to…

Hope your summer is just long enough and fall comes when you think it should.

Sunny Sunday

I keep thinking we’re headed for an early fall. After a cool spring and a mild summer, the signs are there. The daylilies are done except for the rebloomers, which are about to do what they do in fall. The chrysanthemums are budding. The sedum Brilliant and Autumn Joy have flowered. My cottonwoods are losing leaves–not unusual in a dry August. But leaves on my tulip trees (yellow poplars) are also changing, and that is unusual.

We have too many tomatoes. Fortunately, our neighbor didn’t plant this year. Whew.

Lots of gardening still to do, and I’m also needing to put more time into my work in progress. I have submissions out that need following-up and submissions still to–well–submit.

It’s a busy time.

Here’s hoping fall comes at the precise right time for you.

Rainy Sunday

It’s been stinking hot, weather that was supposed to continue for one more day. But the weather girl was wrong again. We woke in the middle of the night to high winds, thunder, and lightning. And the dogs whining to get in the house.

Rain this morning cooled things off, but the damage is done. The cottonwoods are loosing leaves.

The daylilies are finishing up. Buds are opening on the chrysanthemums, and I wonder if we’ll have an early fall. I’ve got lots of cleanup to do before winter sets in. Meanwhile, we’re harvesting peppers, tomatoes, and eggplant. The garlic is ready to eat. Pasta, anyone?

Meanwhile, I’m watching the honeysuckle bloom and the bittersweet turn orange.

Happy Sunday.

Sunny Sunday

Hot and humid–just the way it’s supposed to be. This is Kansas in July. Hard to believe we have only two-and-a-half months left of summer.

Tomatoes are starting to ripen on the vine. Eggplants are fruiting. I have a baby pepper and a baby cucumber. And–so exciting–I’ve fenced a baby watermelon to keep the bunnies and deer and coyotes away.

Hope your Sunday is filled with peace, fruit and vegetables.

Hot and Humid Sunday

Walking out this morning to deadhead the daylilies was like walking into a sauna. Hot, wet, and airless. There’s not a lick of wind and I don’t like it. But the flowers love it.

Here’s what my hibiscus did this morning–three amazing blooms.

The blackberries are coming along–from green to this posy pink, soon to be black. I cut them back severely last fall, so I wonder if the berries will taste funny. That’s what happened to my Top Hat blueberries, which are as sour as lemons this year. Might be a fertilizer issue.

The Mauna Loa daylilies are out in force for just another week or two. Gorgeous while they last.

And now, I’m getting out of the heat. I have some writing to do.

Heat Wave Sunday

We’re having a heat wave with a heat index at or above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. My plants are loving this weather–all except the cool weather crops that have given up the ghost.

Speaking of ghosts, my new Ms. Wilmot’s Ghost is kaput. In its place, I found this variegated liriope, which should tolerate both wet and drought. We’ll see how it does.

And here, believe it or not, is the start of my water lily. I did not at all believe I’d get a flower. I’m waiting for frogs to show up and sit on the leaves.

The ruby slipper hydrangeas are starting to turn pink. Last year, they went from white to brown, making this the very first year we might see red flowers.

And now for the first sign of fall. A red zinnia, the first of what looks like many from the gazillion seed packets I spread over all the beds.

And wow, I got through all that without a single daylily. But here is one. They are loving the heat and the bees.

Stormy Sunday

The storm started last night and continued this morning. Wind and three inches of rain–so far. Thunder and lightning. A good morning to drink coffee and watch everything turn intense green.

Luckily, I walked out to see the damage and we had some.

One of the apple trees fell over in last night’s wind and the stake holding it broke off. Fixed with a new stake.

My tub pond overflowed, which didn’t seem to hurt the irises much. The waterlily is sporting new leaves, too.

But poor Ms. Wilmot’s ghost is drowning. Maybe with some dry weather and sun, she’ll survive. Fingers crossed.

The rain has to stop sometime. Right?

Father’s Day Sunday

Today is Father’s Day, and I thought it would be cool to use some photos of my forebears. But as always, I had technical problems. Without going into the boring details, I had to wait for my son to come and solve my Adobe to JPG problems. He also cleaned up these very old photos.

So here is Grandpa Harry Kreps at his wedding to Ida. My father’s parents, which seems appropriate for Father’s Day.

And here is my father, Saul, graduating from high school. Maybe. That would’ve been in 1935. Or thereabouts.

Happy Father’s Day, Harry and Saul. You’re missed.